The agreement with Australia includes the signing of seven Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) in which government authorities of both sides will tackle different projects and initiatives, such as connecting National Single Windows, electronic certification for importing and exporting goods, and sharing and verifying electronic business documents using Distributed Ledger technology. For more details on the Singapore Agreement on the Digital Economy, the full text of SADEA and information on the different MOUs, see: www.mti.gov.sg/Improving-Trade/Digital-Economy-Agreements. "With Covid-19 forcing companies to find innovative ways to reach customers and adapt to a new type of business activity, agreements like Sadea will enable our companies to seize opportunities in the digital economy and use new technologies to create new digital products and services," Chan said. Chan said: "The agreement will facilitate the digitalisation of business processes and make it easier and cheaper for Singaporean companies to conduct cross-border business with Australia. With Covid-19 forcing businesses to consider innovative ways to reach customers and adapt to a new type of business activity, agreements such as the Singapore-Australia Digital Economy Agreement will enable our businesses to seize the opportunities offered by the digital economy and use new technologies to create new digital products and services. In addition, this new standard for the digital economy will be adopted with even less public scrutiny than Australia`s usual contracting process; it does not require any amendment of the law and will therefore not be debated or voted on in Parliament. The digital economy agreement will facilitate the digitization of business processes and make it easier and cheaper for Singaporean companies to conduct cross-border business with Australia, said Minister of Trade and Industry Chan Chun Sing. SINGAPORE ( ) - Singapore and Australia have signed an agreement that will open up economic opportunities for both countries. OW also implies the obligation to work towards the mutual recognition of digital identification systems and access to data in order to foster the development of new digital products, services and solutions. In particular, Australian trade unions oppose restrictions on the regulation of cross-border data flows, limiting requirements for the presence and storage of data at local level, and limiting access to source code. These rules will consolidate the deregulation of the digital economy and consolidate the power of big tech companies over workers. Although tech companies have not invented precarious work, many business models have been developed for digital platforms based on precariousness and exploiting practices. The DEA can be implemented through the Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) mechanism in SAFTA and will give additional power to technology companies.

The Australian Pact was the second of these agreements for Singapore, which aimed to establish digital trade rules and cooperation between the economies of the digital economy. At a time when governments should focus on how to recover and rebuild from the COVID-19 crisis, which requires the regulatory space to respond, the Australian government should not enter into agreements that restrict its regulatory ability in the public interest. . . .